Last edited by Yogar
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands found in the catalog.

Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands

John R Host

Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands

by John R Host

  • 298 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in Odgen, UT .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest thinning,
  • Ponderosa pine

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJohn R. Host, David P. Lowery
    SeriesResearch paper INT -- 311
    ContributionsLowery, David P, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination14 p. :
    Number of Pages14
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13606899M

    Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands / View Metadata. By: Host, John R. - Lowery, David P. - Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah) Publication info: [Ogden, Utah]:U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Improve Your Pine Stand by Thinning - FSA Author: Kyle Cunningham, Tamara Walkinstick, Caroll Guffey Subject: An overview of why, when, and how to perform thinning operations in pine stands. Keywords: pine, loblolly, thinning, management, plantation, harvest Created Date: .

    Tips on Growing Ponderosa Pine. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) is a large coniferous tree with a lifespan of up to years. There are two principal varieties of ponderosa, known commonly as. Heavy thinning of ponderosa pine stands. [Fort Collins, CO]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, [] (OCoLC)

      Sun shines through the mist in a stand of Ponderosa pines in Coconino National Forest. Managers are accelerating a program to t acres of the tress this year to reduce wildfire risks in northern Arizona forests. (Photo by Brady Smith/U.S. Forest Service). Progress 10/01/03 to 09/30/04 Outputs Unit scientists continued our work on response of ponderosa pine forests to thinning and prescribed fire. We also initiated a project to study varying levels of fire salvage intensity and continued the young stand modeling work for California, Oregon and Washington.


Share this book
You might also like
Effect of changing prices upon income to land from cattle and sheep ranching, as illustrated by data for Montana, 1910 to 1936

Effect of changing prices upon income to land from cattle and sheep ranching, as illustrated by data for Montana, 1910 to 1936

Burning through

Burning through

An Internet Experts Guide to Starting an Online Business

An Internet Experts Guide to Starting an Online Business

Handbook of maritime conventions

Handbook of maritime conventions

Automatic and remote control 3

Automatic and remote control 3

Manual of Christian archeology

Manual of Christian archeology

Employers of registered lobbyists.

Employers of registered lobbyists.

Draft treaty on outer space, the moon and other celestial bodies.

Draft treaty on outer space, the moon and other celestial bodies.

Dual nationality.

Dual nationality.

Roary ORourke

Roary ORourke

man for all seasons

man for all seasons

Proceedings IFYGL symposium

Proceedings IFYGL symposium

Waylander II, in the realm of the wolf

Waylander II, in the realm of the wolf

Bridging the seven seas

Bridging the seven seas

Whitney Studio Club and American art, 1900-1932

Whitney Studio Club and American art, 1900-1932

Engines

Engines

Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands by John R Host Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands. [John R Host; David P Lowery; Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah)].

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands / Related Titles. Series: Research paper INT ; By. Host, John R. Lowery, David P. Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden, Utah) Type. Book Material. United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, "Salvage and Thinning Operations in Second-Growth Ponderosa Pine Stands" ().

Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands / By John R. Host, David P. Lowery and Utah) Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Ogden Topics: Forest thinning, Ponderosa pineCited by: 1. This report describes and discusses a harvesting system made up of commercially available equipment and modified farm tractors that has been successfully used to salvage and thin second-growth ponderosa pine stands.

Commercial equipment consisted of fellerbunchers, a skidder, and a chipper. Salvage and thinning operations in second-growth ponderosa pine stands [microform] / John R.

Host, Davi Silvicultural control of dwarf mistletoe in southwestern ponderosa pine [microform] / L.J. Heidmann; Seed production in a southwestern ponderosa pine on a sedimentary soil [microform] /.

The main objectives of thinning as a management practice in pine stands are to: • Redistribute growth potential of the stand to trees that have potential to become high quality, valuable timber. • Promote or improve the health and vigor of individual trees in order to reduce the risk of losing the entire.

Thinning pine stands reduces stand stress as fewer trees per acre are competing for water, sunlight, and nutrients. THINNING METHODS There are several thinning methods that can be employed once it is determined that a stand should be thinned.

Choice of a method is usually based on stand density, stand uniformity, and owner objective. The Trigo fire burned ha of the Manzano Mountains in central New Mexico in The fire burned with mixed severity through ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands on the Cibola National Forest and private burned area exhibited a range of stand densities enabling this research to quantify the relationship between variation in tree density and burn severity using the.

Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. Ponderosa Pine. Pinaceae -- Pine family. William W. Oliver and Russell A. Ryker. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), also called western yellow pine, is one of the most widely distributed pines in western North America.A major source of timber, ponderosa pine forests are also important as wildlife habitat, for recreational use, and for esthetic values.

Full Text; PDF ( K) PDF-Plus ( K) Citing articles; Thinning ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands reduces mortality while maintaining stand productivityJianwei Zhang, a Martin W. Ritchie, a Douglas A.

Maguire, b William W. Oliver a a USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Avtech Parkway, Redding, CAUSA. Proper thinning of dense young stands of ponderosa pine increases the growth rate of remaining trees and thereby shortens the time re-quired to grow timber of any desired size.

The extent of improvement in growth is shown by thinning studies in the Pacific Northwest cover-ing periods of 10 to 24 years. These studies, together with general. Growth and structural changes in a mosaic of even-aged ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands were studied for 25 years to determine the long-term impacts of a heavy thinning treatment to a basal-area level of 25 ft2/acre.

Basal area and volume growth of these stands has increased since thinning and likely will continue to increase as the residual trees increase in size.

INT-RP Salvage and Thinning Operations in Second-Growth Ponderosa Pine Stands. INT-RP Fireline Production: A Conceptual Model. INT-RP Potential Spotting Distance from Wind-Driven Surface Fires.

INT-RP Effect of Western Spruce Budworm on Douglas-fir Cone Production in Western Montana. Salvage logging is the practice of logging trees in forest areas that have been damaged by wildfire, flood, severe wind, disease, insect infestation, or other natural disturbance in order to recover economic value that would otherwise be lost.

Although the primary motivation of salvage logging is economic, it has also been suggested that salvage logging may reduce erosion, reduce intensity of.

Habitat: Ponderosa pine trees occur as pure stands or in mixed conifer forests in the mountains. It is an important component of the Interior Ponderosa Pine, Pacific Ponderosa Pine-Douglas fir, and Pacific Ponderosa Pine forest cover types.

In the northwest, it is typically associated with Rocky Mountain Douglas fir, lodgepole pine, grand fir, and. Ponderosa pine is typically dominant on warm, dry sites with a short growing season and very low summer precipitation.

Temperatures annual average 41° to 50° F with extremes ranging from ° to ° F. Being drought tolerant, it out competes other species to.

ponderosa pine forests of western North America. Individual outbreaks last up to two decades, killing as much as 60 percent of the trees and 80 percent of the stand volume. During in areOregon, beetles reached epidemic levels in the many stands of lodgepole and second- growth ponderosa pine.

Losses ter, occurred for the most part in un. The effectiveness of thinning for reducing stand susceptibility to several species of bark beetles was evaluated in ponderosa pine and Jeffrey pine forests over a year period in the Tahoe.

others () argue that intensive salvage, thinning, and many other logging activi- ing a crown fire in the ponderosa pine stand (fig. 9). If the stand was dominated by especially in.even-age stand? • Do you want a mixed-species stand?

• What is the site’s carrying capacity? • Will the stand be thinned later? Discuss these questions with your OSU Extension forester or a forestry consultant before planting.

Common spacing for newly planted ponderosa pine plantings is about 10 to 12 feet apart. Vegetation management.• Restore old growth and second-growth forests and riparian areas with ecologically driven tree thinning, shrub mowing, and prescribed fire.

• Protect both the forest and nearby homes by restoring forest conditions more likely to support low intensity, stand-maintaining fire behavior characteristic of the ponderosa pine forest type.